Airlines

What Will a Year Cost Me?

The Pilot Network recently had a great discussion of a question I hear all the time: "I'm at risk for a non-flying 179-day (or 365-day) deployment. Should I put in separation papers right away to preempt deployment orders, or roll the dice and risk getting stuck in the military for an extra year?" I also hear a related question very frequently: "I'm only a few years from retirement, but if I stay in my final assignment will be a non-flying one. Will finishing my career in a non-flying job hurt me?"

Airline Pilot - First Year in Review

(Edit 24 Feb 17: Added some discussion on furlough.

A few months after starting work at a major airline, I wrote an article taking my newly available truth data available about airline pilot pay and comparing it to military pilot pay. That article has been read more than 41,000 times and was republished in The Pilot Network Quarterly (TPNQ.)

Logbook Battle Royale!


All right friends, it's time for what you've all been waiting for: The Logbook Battle Royale!

If you're a pilot, you need to keep your own logbook. End of debate. Questions?

Not convinced? Check out this page addressing some of the reasons why it's important to keep a logbook.

Why Keep a Logbook?

If you're a pilot, you need to keep your own logbook. End of debate. Questions?

Truthfully though, here are a few reasons that you should be keeping a logbook:

  • Airline applications. When you apply to an airline, they want to see your logbook. Yes, most will accept a jumble of military records and mangled hardcover logbooks from when you got your private pilot license. However, wouldn't you rather be able to present your interviewers with a clean, sleek stack of paper?

Preparing for the Logbook Battle Royale

Update 8 Nov 16: It's on! Click here to read the full Logbook Battle Royale!

Short-Term Pilot Shortage Solutions for the USAF

I've written a couple articles recently comparing the financial angle of staying in the military for a full retirement vs. getting out halfway through to start an airline career 9 years earlier. My second article was prompted by proposals to increase the USAF's pilot retention bonus from $25K per year to as much as $60K per year. The USAF Chief of Staff (CSAF) and the Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF) put forth their proposal because the Air Force is having trouble retaining pilots.

Fly Jets, See the World, Get Rich!

The career of airline pilot isn't what it used to be in the US. It used to be prestigious, respected, and pay ridiculously well. Nowadays, either you spend 10 years flying for the military, or you starve for up to 10 years flying for the regionals. Then, finally, you get hired by a major airline and start living the good life. (But the pay today is generally less than what it was before 2001, before you even start talking about inflation.) It's not the same level of good deal that it used to be.

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